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  1. This is quite a complex question. From a biochemical point of view, marijuana does not cause any particular harm to the brain (hypoxia from the smoking process will not be taken into account). At least, such mechanisms are not known to science.

    But intelligence is not only the physiological abilities of the brain, but also the habit of thinking and solving problems. This is where things get more complicated.

    1) People who are used to getting stoned all the time when they are in a bad mood, thus create the illusion of easy decisions for themselves and corrupt themselves by putting things off for later or simply forgetting about a lot of things. When you smoke, the world seems simple and pleasant, and you get used to the fact that this state is achievable at any time when you want. This is certainly not conducive to self-development and does not make a person smarter. Also, the habit of “smoking at home to cartoons on Friday instead of going for a walk or going to the movies”will not make you smarter. And it's pretty easy to get.

    2) But on the other hand, in a stoned state, you perceive things much more vividly, see them from new points of view, think about unusual aspects of what you see around you. Then you let go, but you have already expanded your consciousness a little, and in a sober state you will still have this opportunity to look at things from an unusual, unobvious point of view.

    3) There are studies that show that statistically among marijuana smokers there is a higher percentage of people prone to schizophrenia. But statistics are deceptive, especially in biology. It would seem that this means that smoking contributes to the development of mental illness. But on the other hand, couldn't it be the other way around? What fragile, vulnerable and sensitive psyche leads a person to companies and subcultures where they smoke weed?

    4) The first article that comes across on pabmed says that they get stupid from frequent use (again, everything is based on statistics, and see point 3 about it), and on the contrary, they get smarter from rare ones. True, it is quite old, for 2002. nih.gov

    And here's another one: heavy use affects negatively, but reversibly. nih.gov

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